What You Need To Know Regarding Diabetes Diet

  • By lacixevi
  • On 02/06/2015
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Are you having troubles controlling diabetes? Discover some ideas on how individuals with diabetes can consume wholesome foods and manage their blood sugar.

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A filling and healthy lunch can help you get through the day without snacking on high-carb junk food and other empty calories. Try to eat a two to three servings of vegetables as part of your midday meal (1 cup of raw vegetables = 1 serving). Salads are a great way to include a variety of non starchy veggies and a lean protein plus, you can easily sneak in whole grains or enjoy them on the side. Add a serving of fruit or low-fat dairy to round out your lunch. Again, portions and meal planning can be personalized to your specific needs by working with a diabetes educator or dietitian.

To determine the daily calorie requirements for specific individuals, multiply the number of pounds of ideal weight by 12 - 15 calories. The number of calories per pound depends on gender, age, and activity levels. For instance a 50-year-old moderately active woman who wants to maintain a weight of 135 pounds and is mildly active might need only 12 calories per pound (1,620 calories a day). A 25-year old female athlete who wants to maintain the same weight might need 25 calories per pound (2,025 calories a day).

Fats should provide 25 - 35% of daily calories. Monounsaturated (such as olive, peanut, canola oils; and avocados and nuts) and omega-3 polyunsaturated (such as fish, flaxseed oil, and walnuts) fats are the best types. Limit saturated fat (red meat, butter) to less than 7% of daily calories. Choose nonfat or low-fat dairy instead of whole milk products. Limit trans-fats (such as hydrogenated fat found in snack foods, fried foods, and commercially baked goods) to less than 1% of total calories.

Researchers believe that the key to weight control lies in reducing the amount of refined carbohydrates in your diet. Instead, focus on low GI or coal” foods which keep you feeling fuller much longer. Low-glycemic foods take longer to digest so sugar is absorbed more slowly into the bloodstream. As a result you're less likely to experience a spike in your blood sugar level, you'll remain sated for longer, and are less likely to overeat.


The recipes and advice in The Diabetes Diet will provide readers with an easy-to-follow guide for controlling their disease and regaining their health and well-being. There are an estimated 18 million diabetics in America, and their number is increasing every year-yet there are no low-carb diet books appropriate for diabetics. Since publication in 1997, Dr. Bernstein's Diabetes Solution and its revised 2003 edition have sold more than 120,000 copies. An engineer by training, Bernstein pioneered blood glucose self-monitoring and the tight control of blood sugar that is now accepted as the standard treatment of diabetes. He entered medical school at the age of 45 in order to publish his findings.

In general, diabetes dietary guidelines recommend that proteins should provide 12 - 20% of total daily calories. This daily amount poses no risk to the kidney in people who do not have kidney disease. Protein is important for strong muscles and bones. Some doctors recommend a higher proportion of protein (20 - 30%) for patients with pre- or type 2 diabetes. They think that eating more protein helps people feel more full and thus reduces overall calories. In addition, protein consumption helps the body maintain lean body mass during weight loss.


It's easy to underestimate the amount of calories and carbs in alcoholic drinks, including beer and wine. And cocktails mixed with soda and juice can be loaded with sugar. If you're going to drink, do so in moderation (no more than 1 drink per day for women; 2 for men), choose calorie-free drink mixers, and drink only with food. If you're diabetic, always monitor your blood glucose, as alcohol can interfere with diabetes medication and insulin.


The The Diabetes Diet was designed for controlling blood sugars in diabetics, but its health and weight-management benefits apply to everyone. Focusing on protein, fat, and slow-acting carbohydrate, this plan prevents the blood sugar roller-coaster ride caused by a carbohydrate-heavy diet, which can result in obesity, increased blood pressure, and damage to the lining of the blood vessels. A diabetic himself for almost sixty years, Dr. Bernstein meticulously followed the guidelines of the American Diabetes Association, yet his health steadily deteriorated. It wasn't until he devised his own, more effective method for regulating blood sugar that Dr. Bernstein started to enjoy a healthy life.
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